group of elementary aged kids lying on the grass outside and smiling

Let’s Play Outside

For twenty-five years Pat Rumbaugh was a physical education teacher and coach. Pat’s experiences helped her understand that kids need and deserve time to play every day. “Why are there not books of real children playing?”

Pat’s play expertise together with Daniel Nakamura’s photography produced this one-of-a-kind book.

Do you value play? Share this book with your child’s preschool, elementary school, the local library, a place of worship, or as a present to other families. As Pat likes to say, “Everyone deserves to play.”

Let’s Play Outside

Year-round, children and parents are looking for ideas that will bring the whole family on board to go outside and play.

Pat Rumbaugh, known around the world as The Play Lady, and talented movement-in-action photographer Daniel Nakamura created Let’s Play Outside a book your children will love. Children and families will be inspired by the eye-catching photographs of children playing outside. The inviting text to play will immediately have your children asking to go outside and play.

Here are five tips from the book Let’s Play Outside for children and families.

1. Watch the voice trailer and read the book with your family.
Rae Pica, early childhood consultant and author says, “This book is a testament to the joys and wonder of outdoor play. The photographs are stunning and the perfect accompaniment to the text. This book encourages those who live and work with children to send the little ones outside.”

2. Learning through play.
Playing games and activities outside is a great way for children to develop all kinds of skills. For instance, while playing hopscotch, a child learns math and develops physical skills. Playing follow-the-leader or Simon Says helps children build listening skills and learn to follow directions.

3. Places to play.
Children and their families are more likely to play in areas within a fifteen-minute walk of their homes like outside parks and playgrounds. But there are other creative ways to find safe places for children to play:

  • Some school playgrounds might be open to the public on evenings and weekends.
  • Check for local businesses with open parking areas.
  • Can a street be closed every Saturday or Sunday morning for three hours, for children to play.
  • Consider inviting neighborhood children over to play in the backyard, in the driveway, or on play equipment in your yard.

4. Safety.
It is important that children have the opportunity to take risks when they play, but there are certain safety rules to explain beforehand:

  • Do not push or hurry others while on the playground equipment.
  • Wait for your turn.
  • Stand in a safe place when waiting for your turn on the swing.
  • Leave bikes and backpacks out of the play area.
  • Always wear a helmet while riding a bike, but take it off while on playground equipment.

5. Be kind and respectful to everyone.
Before playtime, discuss these simple principles for play so everyone can have fun:

  • Invite other children to play and share your toys.
  • Everyone takes a turn when playing together.
  • Ask politely if you would like to play with someone else’s toys.

 

  • For twenty-five years Pat Rumbaugh was a physical education teacher and coach. Pat’s experiences helped her understand that kids need and deserve time to play every day. “Why are there not books of real children playing?”

    Pat’s play expertise together with Daniel Nakamura’s photography produced this one-of-a-kind book.

    Do you value play? Share this book with your child’s preschool, elementary school, the local library, a place of worship, or as a present to other families. As Pat likes to say, “Everyone deserves to play.”

    Let’s Play Outside

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